Greg Piccini

Associate, Senior Project Architect

Some architects are motivated by creating a ‘grand gesture’, agonizing over early sketches and proposing grand concepts. What drew Greg to architecture was the practicalities of working through the details as the dream moves from paper to reality.

“The initial sketch is great, but there is so much opportunity and excitement that comes from the process of nailing down the details. It’s in the details where you can highlight one aspect of the design that can become the best space in a building.”

Photo by Greg of the MOA designed by Arthur Erickson
Photo by Greg of water in a creek rushing by rocks
Photo by Greg of rooftop grand and water feature
Photo by Greg of forest moss hanging off branches
Photo by Greg of rocks, trees and mountains reflecting in still water
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Greg is particularly inspired by the architecture of public spaces. This love of creating memorable public interior experiences is perhaps part of what drew Greg to develop his specialty in performing arts centres. Clientele in these spaces expect a memorable, special experience that starts with spectacular design and includes seamless functionality in moving large groups of people through a facility. The problem solving and detailed coordination required by these types of projects play to Greg’s strengths. What Greg has found working on complex, multi-year projects is the amount of effort required in early stage planning, on-site research, and behind-the-scenes coordination is often proportional to the final result of a project that delights and surprises the owner, end users, and the public. Spending a large portion of his career on the West Coast of Canada, Greg has picked up some of the sensibilities to landscape as well as different materials to his work at Martin Simmons Sweers. “I’m interested in the integration of architecture and landscape. I’m inspired by Arthur Erickson’s work in Vancouver, the way he brings the outside in and vice versa. You never feel far away from your surroundings and the outdoors.” While out West, Greg worked on several heavy timber buildings and learned about the pros, cons, and, how to work around building codes that were designed for other types of materials.

“I like figuring out what makes a space lead you to feel awestruck or comfortable or contemplative.”

Greg Piccini

Associate, Senior Project Architect

Some architects are motivated by creating a ‘grand gesture’, agonizing over early sketches and proposing grand concepts. What drew Greg to architecture was the practicalities of working through the details as the dream moves from paper to reality.

“The initial sketch is great, but there is so much opportunity and excitement that comes from the process of nailing down the details. It’s in the details where you can highlight one aspect of the design that can become the best space in a building.”

Photo by Greg of the MOA designed by Arthur Erickson
Photo by Greg of water in a creek rushing by rocks
Photo by Greg of rooftop grand and water feature
Photo by Greg of forest moss hanging off branches
Photo by Greg of rocks, trees and mountains reflecting in still water
No items found.

Greg is particularly inspired by the architecture of public spaces. This love of creating memorable public interior experiences is perhaps part of what drew Greg to develop his specialty in performing arts centres. Clientele in these spaces expect a memorable, special experience that starts with spectacular design and includes seamless functionality in moving large groups of people through a facility. The problem solving and detailed coordination required by these types of projects play to Greg’s strengths. What Greg has found working on complex, multi-year projects is the amount of effort required in early stage planning, on-site research, and behind-the-scenes coordination is often proportional to the final result of a project that delights and surprises the owner, end users, and the public. Spending a large portion of his career on the West Coast of Canada, Greg has picked up some of the sensibilities to landscape as well as different materials to his work at Martin Simmons Sweers. “I’m interested in the integration of architecture and landscape. I’m inspired by Arthur Erickson’s work in Vancouver, the way he brings the outside in and vice versa. You never feel far away from your surroundings and the outdoors.” While out West, Greg worked on several heavy timber buildings and learned about the pros, cons, and, how to work around building codes that were designed for other types of materials.

“I like figuring out what makes a space lead you to feel awestruck or comfortable or contemplative.”

“Timber provides a warm, welcoming space. I’ve found that everyone really likes being in a wood building in that it seems to go to a deep emotional level that makes people feel comfortable and at peace.” Now timber is becoming an increasingly popular building structure in Ontario, and Greg is interested to see how it can be applied to this environment as well. Greg is inspired by the buildings of late Arthur Erickson and other architects who have followed in incorporating architecture with landscape to blur the lines between interior and exterior. Greg draws inspiration from and enjoys photographing the mountains and nature of British Columbia.

“A major project like this needs a great leader, Greg is a fantastic project manager who was instrumental to keeping the project moving forward on time. You know he will see every aspect of the project through from start to finish. He’s a pleasure to work with.”

Ed Fasan

Notable Projects

“We were fortunate to work with a great team to accomplish this monumental office renovation with critical phasing and tight timing. The interior design team, the consultants, the contractor, and the client came together to help us make [Manulife Financial Head Office] shine.”